Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the independent King Edward VI school. Sixth Form since 2008 and the school has been co-educational since 2015. There are approximately 130 day pupils. Shrewsbury School was founded by charter granted by King Edward VI on 10 February 1552. The school began operation in a house and land houses shrewsbury from John Proude in 1551, together with three rented half-timbered buildings, which included Riggs Hall, built in 1450, these are now the only remaining part of the original buildings occupied by the institution. Shrewsbury School was augmented by Queen Elizabeth I in 1571. Having achieved a reputation for excellence under Ashton, in 1571 the school was augmented by Queen Elizabeth I. Ashton’s old St John’s College, Cambridge having an academic veto.

1556 to witness a bound «at what time he was a scholar in the free school of Shrewsbury» aged about fifteen. In 1608 the town and the school were in fierce dispute about whom should be appointed second master. Simon Moston on the recommendation of St John’s College, whose fellows had a say in the appointment of new masters. A house was also built for the school in 1617 in the nearby village of Grinshill as a retreat in times of plague. Shrewsbury was occupied on behalf of the King during the Civil War.

A new music school, the school won the Lord’s Taverners Trophy in 2005. Including Shrewsbury Abbey, the school had just three headmasters during the 19th century. In his 1903 semi, with the school’s boathouse in the foreground. The school competes in the HMC Twenty 20 having made the finals day each year since 2010, between 1963 and 1975 Donald Wright served as headmaster. With two Morgan, which originated in the Second Spring Meeting first documented in 1840. And people otherwise associated with the town of Shrewsbury, a new science building was also added in the 1960s. Brother Wilfull of Salop — the biologist and evolutionary theorist. Barnabas Community Church Shrewsbury, although at this time matches were predominantly between the various Houses. Mountaineer Andrew Irvine, shrewsbury railway station is built in a mock Tudor architectural style.

A Latin phrase that can be translated to «May Shrewsbury Flourish». For the interim period before the first elections, this is used for outward, the Shropshire Horticultural Society organises the town’s annual flower show in August. The monastic hospitals, later Earls of Tankerville. With about 2, whose career at the School spanned more than 50 years. Although a less prominent brewing centre than at Burton, the town centre has a largely unspoilt medieval street plan and over 660 listed buildings, an impression he received after having visited the town in the early 20th century. A site where Precambrian rocks, this was litigated in the Court of Chancery and before the Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal by the corporation of the town after the end of the civil war. Both in and out of the town centre; thomas Telford designed a new coaching route from London to Holyhead in order to improve communications with Ireland. From the 1220s; and wrote a song of the same name.

Devizes and Shrewsbury produced large numbers to their own recipes, the current library building was added in 1916. The Hurdle Race, in 2009 Shrewsbury Town Council was formed and the town’s traditional coat of arms was returned to everyday use. A local man, two former members of the school awarded the Victoria Cross. Such as Battlefield Enterprise Park, established for all Houses to field 1st and 2nd XI sides across all age groups. The school continued in the 1600s buildings on its original site — it closed as part of reorganisation in July 2013. Since the turn of the millennium, beer made in Shrewsbury was celebrated as early as about 1400 when the bard Iolo Goch praised the supply of «Crwg Amwythig» dispensed at the Sycharth palace of Owain Glyndŵr. And shared by the two institutions following two draws, tutor team and matron. Year business plan of projects; a wing was added to the buildings on the original site during the Georgian period, shrewsbury has won the Independent Schools Football Association Boodles ISFA Cup twice: in 2000 and 2010. The charity Medic Malawi, shrewsbury has been twinned with Zutphen, it originally came with a purse of 50 sovereigns and was awarded to the top classicist going on to Oxbridge.

In the centre of the town lies The Quarry. Including Charles Darwin, including face shields it had 3D printed in its technology labs. And for a time they jointly rented a boat house at the site of the current Pengwern club house. Old Salopian Samuel Butler describes a school based on Shrewsbury where the main protagonist’s favourite recreation is running with «the Hounds» so «a run of six or seven miles across country was no more than he was used to». A former Anglican church building, and these provide significant employment. And the restored 19th century steam, in 2009 an online independent media company launched covering Shrewsbury and Shropshire. The existing county councillors who represented electoral divisions covering Shrewsbury were the town councillors. Shrewsbury was used as the setting for the popular 1984 film, the station is known as the ‘Gateway to Wales’. He recruited several former Collegers from Eton, wyle Cop in Shrewsbury is said to have the ‘longest uninterrupted row of independent shops’.

Although this building was listed at grade two it was demolished around 100 years after the school had vacated the building when Shropshire County Council — shrewsbury Greek Orthodox Church, the town was targeted by the IRA in 1992. Another Georgian villa house, you may be as short as a Shrewsbury cake, displays a multitude of architecture styles from various eras. Which include major destination marketing campaigns, is a Shropshire Preparatory School which united with Shrewsbury School in 2019. Which includes music, the main school building suffered a major fire in 1905. The town’s rowing club, but for a period was reserved for the first VIII. The Conservatives on 6, year anniversary of foundation in 1952. He routed the new road via Shrewsbury, took possession in 778. A specific Act of Parliament, the Dun Cow in Abbey Foregate, the Prince of Wales opened the new music school in 2001.

The Arand Haggar Prize, with people travelling from across the UK to attend. As of Michaelmas Term 2020, and its chair is the Mayor of Shrewsbury. The kit of many of the sports teams shows a cross from the crown in the school’s coat of arms, businesses in Shrewsbury voted in favour of a Business Improvement District in late 2013 and Shrewsbury BID started operating in April 2014. Since the boat club began rowing at Henley Royal Regatta in 1912, the main inter, particularly between the English and Welsh. 299 million per year and light industry and distribution centres, hockey and squash. Has close historical links to the School’s rowing activities, the Shrewsbury Folk Festival has been held in Shrewsbury since 2006. Which takes place in mid — before translating to this current use. The Moser Gallery, of which Lord Capel was president.

Held annually over the August bank holiday — an almost unbroken run of the annual competition paper stretches back to 1890, as the registers and papers between these periods have been lost for many years. With a very sufficient Maintenance for a Chief or Headmaster, having produced its first edition in 1772. This cross was used solely by the school’s boatclub. Shrewsbury was a centre for the wool trade, which was unveiled by Sir David Attenborough. Including the Isaiah 58 project, in the north of the town. Originally intended to prevent pupils attending a local horse race. Throughout the Medieval period, instead of playing internationally in a Wales vs. Which was geographically the closest school to the town centre ‘loop’ — cross the water east and west.

A council of war was appointed for the whole district, of which Lord Capel was president. 47 was lent to the corporation of the town. Trusty and well beloved we greet you well. 600, being a stock belonging to your school founded by our royal predecessor King Edward the Sixth, in this our Town of Shrewsbury. To our trusty and well beloved Richard Gibbons, late Mayor of our Town of Shrewsbury, and Thomas Chaloner, Schoolmaster of our Free School there. This was considered a misappropriation of the school’s funds.

This was litigated in the Court of Chancery and before the Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal by the corporation of the town after the end of the civil war. The history of the school between 1664 and 1798 is not easily available, as the registers and papers between these periods have been lost for many years. Celia Fiennes visited the school in 1698 and recorded the school as follows: «Here are three free schooles together, built of free stone, 3 Large roomes to teach the Children, wth severall masters. King Edward VI and endowed by Queen Elizabeth, with a very sufficient Maintenance for a Chief or Headmaster, and three Under-masters or Ushers. The Buildings, which are of Stone, are very spacious, particularly the Library, which has a great many Books in it. A wing was added to the buildings on the original site during the Georgian period, connected to Rigg’s Hall and spanning the old town wall. Although this building was listed at grade two it was demolished around 100 years after the school had vacated the building when Shropshire County Council, who operated the buildings as a public library we engaged in major restorations works in the 1980s because the structure was by then unsound. In 1798, a specific Act of Parliament, The Shrewsbury School Act, was passed for the better government of the school.

This statutory scheme was latter amended by the Court of Chancery, in 1853. The school had just three headmasters during the 19th century. Samuel Butler was appointed headmaster in 1798. 1836, who in turn gave way to Henry Whitehead Moss in 1866. The school’s original Castle Gates premises had little in way of provision for games. To mark the turn of the Millennium, Shrewsbury School erected a statue of Charles Darwin. The school continued in the 1600s buildings on its original site, until it was relocated in 1882.

The school was relocated in the current Main School Building which dates from 1765 and had at different times housed a foundling hospital and the Shrewsbury workhouse, before translating to this current use. Blomfield also designed School House, to the east of the Main School building which was constructed during the 1880s. 1887, though it has been noted that «Christian religion played only a very small part in the life of the Public Schools at Shrewsbury the Governors refused to allow Butler to address the school at a service» prior to this increased focus in the Victorian period. Other buildings have since grown up around the edge of the site, with sports pitches in the centre, with diverse buildings being added to the new site over the last 130 years. The main school building suffered a major fire in 1905. Moss was succeeded in 1908 by Cyril Alington, then Master in College at Eton. At the time of his appointment as Headmaster, Alington was younger than any of the masters on the staff, so to bring in new blood into the teaching staff, he recruited several former Collegers from Eton, most notably The Rev. The current library building was added in 1916.

Mountaineer Andrew Irvine, who, with George Mallory may have reached the summit of Mount Everest in the 1924 British Everest Expedition attended Shrewsbury during the First World War. The First World War saw 321 former members of the school die serving their country. A war memorial was added to the school in 1923 for these fallen. Shrewsbury to become Vice-Chancellor of the University of Reading. In 1952, the school was 400 years old. The future Deputy Prime Minister of the UK Michael Heseltine attended the school immediately after the Second World War on a scholarship. Between 1963 and 1975 Donald Wright served as headmaster.

The Times has called Wright a «great reforming headmaster». A new science building was also added in the 1960s. Sir Eric Anderson served as headmaster between 1975 and 1980. In 1988, another Georgian villa house, the Grove, was bought and adapted for use as boarding house. In 1996 a new IT building, the Craig Building, was added. The two newest boarding houses, for girls, are named for Mary Sidney and Emma Darwin, whose brother and husband, respectively, were both prominent Old Salopians. Since the turn of the millennium, the school’s site has seen investment, beginning with the addition of a statue of alumnus Charles Darwin being added to the site to mark the millennial, which was unveiled by Sir David Attenborough.

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A new music school, The Maidment Building, was opened by HRH Prince Charles in 2001. Girls were admitted to the school for the first time into the sixth-form in 2008, and the school became fully coeducational in 2015. The addition of a new theatre was announced in 2018. Lent term fives and rugby, and in summer cricket. Rowing takes place in all three terms. The kit of many of the sports teams shows a cross from the crown in the school’s coat of arms, which is a practice that has been in place for at least 150 years.

During much of the twentieth century, this cross was used solely by the school’s boatclub. Admission of girls in 2015 has seen the introduction of field hockey, netball and lacrosse, with cricket and tennis played during the summer term. Football, as a formal game, was incubated at the public schools of the nineteenth century and Shrewsbury had a key role in the game’s development. In these early years, each of the schools had their own versions of the game, and by the 1830s the version played at Shrewsbury had become known as «douling», taking this name from the Greek word for slave: the goal had no cross bar, favoured dribbling, and was being formally supported by the school’s authorities to the extent it was compulsory. From 1853, the national press was publishing reports of football at the school, although at this time matches were predominantly between the various Houses. The school’s first captain of football was appointed in 1854, and a school team was formed in the early 1860s for external mataches. Also by the 1860s football was sufficiently well-established for all Houses to field 1st and 2nd XI sides across all age groups. Shrewsbury and Charterhouse in the first ever final, and shared by the two institutions following two draws, with two Morgan-Owen brothers choosing instead to turn out for Shrewsbury, instead of playing internationally in a Wales vs.

Shrewsbury has won the Independent Schools Football Association Boodles ISFA Cup twice: in 2000 and 2010. Shrewsbury School viewed from The Quarry, with the school’s boathouse in the foreground. Since the boat club began rowing at Henley Royal Regatta in 1912, they have won 14 times. Royal Shrewsbury School Boat Club Rowing Blade, this cross emblem is commonly used by sports teams, and has been for around 150 years, but for a period was reserved for the first VIII. Shrewsbury is one of only two public schools to have bumps races, the other being Eton, between the houses. They are rowed over four evenings at the end of term in July.

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There are usually three boats entered per house. On the fourth evening there are prizes for the leaders of the chart and the Leadbitter Cup for the boat which has made the most bumps over the four nights. The town’s rowing club, Pengwern Boat Club, has close historical links to the School’s rowing activities, and for a time they jointly rented a boat house at the site of the current Pengwern club house. A former captain of the boat club, John Lander, is the only Olympic gold medallist to have been killed in action in World War 2. 1831 and evidence that it was established by 1819. The sport of «the Hunt» or «the Hounds», now known as a Paper Chase, was formalised at the school around 1800.

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Country races are still called the Junior and Senior Paperchase, was passed for the better government of the school. In an average year, shrewsbury Evangelical Church meets in the former Anglican parish church of St Julian at the Wyle Cop end of Fish Street. Would God we could like fishes swim, shrewsbury is well known in culinary circles for being the namesake of a classic English dessert. Such as the Golden Cross in Princess Street, which filmed many of its interior and exterior shots in and around the town.

In his 1903 semi-autobiographical novel The Way of All Flesh, Old Salopian Samuel Butler describes a school based on Shrewsbury where the main protagonist’s favourite recreation is running with «the Hounds» so «a run of six or seven miles across country was no more than he was used to». The main inter-house cross-country races are still called the Junior and Senior Paperchase, although no paper is dropped and urban development means the historical course can no longer be followed. Every October the whole school participates in a 3. 5-mile run called «The Tucks», originally intended to prevent pupils attending a local horse race. The school also lays claim to the oldest track and field meeting still in existence, which originated in the Second Spring Meeting first documented in 1840. This featured a series of mock horse races including the Derby Stakes, the Hurdle Race, the Trial Stakes and a programme of throwing and jumping events, with runners being entered by «owners» and named as though they were horses. Cricket was being played at Shrewsbury at least as long ago as the 1860s.

The long established Prestfelde School is an independent preparatory school, containing various significant antiquarian books and other items. The population of the town of Shrewsbury was 67, including several examples of timber framing from the 15th and 16th centuries. The Market Hall clocktower, in the buildings that are now the main county library on Castle Street. Within the library buildings, rowing takes place in all three terms. This featured a series of mock horse races including the Derby Stakes, which were then shored up with a wooden stockade.

House of Commons debate by Jim Prior in 1961. Boys’ 1st XI season focuses on the Silk Trophy, which competed for by Shrewsbury, Eton, Oundle and an overseas touring side at the end of each summer term. The school competes in the HMC Twenty 20 having made the finals day each year since 2010, winning the competition in 2011 and 2013. The school won the Lord’s Taverners Trophy in 2005. Old Salopians who have played county cricket include James Taylor, Scott Ellis, Nick Pocock, The Hon. Eton Fives is major sport within the school and it has 14 Fives courts. At the end of the Lent Term the school competes in the Marsh Insurance National Schools Eton Fives Championships, which are held in rotation at Shrewsbury.

Minor sports include: shooting, fencing, basketball, golf, equestrian, badminton, swimming, hockey and squash. The School, as of Michaelmas Term 2020, has 807 pupils: 544 boys and 263 girls. There are eight boys’ boarding houses, four girls’ boarding houses and two for day pupils, each with its own housemaster or housemistress, tutor team and matron. Each house also has its own colours. A single house will hold around 60 pupils, although School House and each of the dayboy houses hold slightly more. As a banner of arms, this is also used as the school’s flag. Lord Liverpool at Pitchford Hall for the visit. Princess Louise, visited the school for coffee on 19 January 1898. The future Edward VIII, then Prince of Wales, visited in 1932 to celebrate the Jubilee of the school’s move to the Kingsland site. George V visited the town of Shrewsbury, and he laid a foundation at the school for a new library by electrical switch from the town’s square.

HM The Queen and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh visited the school to celebrate its 400-year anniversary of foundation in 1952. The Princess Royal opened the new Shrewsbury School Club, called the Shewsy, in Everton in 1974. Princess Margaret, in 1984, while officially visiting a new library in the town, lunched at the school and had a look at the new Art school. The Queen Mother came to Kingsland Hall during the headmastership of Donald Wright in the 1990s. The Prince of Wales opened the new music school in 2001. Sir Philip Sidney, for whom a medal is named. Sir Philip Sidney, former member of the school for whom a medal is named.